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The following Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and
Results of Operations ("MD&A") is intended to help readers understand our
results of operations, financial condition and cash flows and should be read in
conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and the related
notes included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended
December 31, 2021 ("Annual Report on Form 10-K"). This discussion contains
forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual
results could differ materially from those discussed below.

For purposes of this MD&A, the term "we" and other forms thereof refer to Clear
Secure, Inc. and its subsidiaries (collectively, the "Company"), which includes
Alclear Holdings, LLC ("Alclear").

Forward-looking statements


This quarterly report includes certain forward-looking statements within the
meaning of the federal securities laws regarding, among other things, our or
management's intentions, plans, beliefs, expectations or predictions of future
events, which are considered forward-looking statements. You should not place
undue reliance on those statements because they are subject to numerous
uncertainties and factors relating to our operations and business environment,
all of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond our control.
Forward-looking statements include information concerning our possible or
assumed future results of operations, including descriptions of our business
strategy. These statements often include words such as "may," "will," "should,"
"believe," "expect," "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "estimate," or similar
expressions. These statements are based upon assumptions that we have made in
light of our experience in the industry, as well as our perceptions of
historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other
factors that we believe are appropriate under the circumstances. As you read
this quarterly report, you should understand that these statements are not
guarantees of performance or results. They involve known and unknown risks,
uncertainties and assumptions, including those described under the heading "Risk
Factors" in our Annual Report on Form 10-K. Although we believe that these
forward-looking statements are based upon reasonable assumptions, you should be
aware that many factors, including those described under the heading "Risk
Factors" in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, could affect our actual financial
results or results of operations and could cause actual results to differ
materially from those in the forward-looking statements.

Our forward-looking statements made herein are made only as of the date of this
quarterly report. We expressly disclaim any intent, obligation or undertaking to
update or revise any forward-looking statements made herein to reflect any
change in our expectations with regard thereto or any change in events,
conditions or circumstances on which any such statements are based. All
subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or
persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the
cautionary statements contained in this quarterly report.

Insight


We are a member-centric secure identity platform operating under the brand name
CLEAR. At CLEAR we know that you are always you-your biometric identity is
foundational to helping enable frictionless everyday experiences, connecting you
to all the things that make you, YOU, and transforming the way you live, work
and travel. Members enroll in CLEAR to create an unbreakable link between their
identity and biometrics (e.g., eyes, face and fingerprints). CLEAR's current
offerings include: CLEAR Plus, a consumer aviation subscription service, which
enables access to predictable and fast experiences through dedicated entry lanes
in airport security checkpoints nationwide; the flagship CLEAR App including
Home to Gate and Health Pass; and Reserve powered by CLEAR, our virtual queuing
technology that enables customers to manage lines. CLEAR also has software
development kits, ("SDK") and application programming interface ("API")
capabilities to enable our partners to seamlessly integrate directly into our
platform to enable better, faster and more frictionless experiences for our
partners' customers. Use cases enabled by SDKs and APIs include identity
validation, identity verification, attribute validation such as age validation,
vaccine status and payment, among others.

Key Factors Affecting Performance

We believe that our current and future financial growth depends on many factors, including the key factors affecting performance described below.

Ability to increase the total number of cumulative registrations


We are focused on growing Total Cumulative Enrollments and the number of members
that engage with our platform. Our operating results and growth opportunities
depend, in part, on our ability to attract new members, including paying
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members (CLEAR Plus members) as well as new platform members. We rely on
multiple channels to attract new CLEAR Plus members, including in-airport (our
largest channel) which in turn is dependent on the ongoing ability of our
ambassadors to successfully engage with the traveling public. We also rely on
numerous digital channels such as paid search and partnerships. In many cases,
we offer limited time free trials to new members who may convert to paying
members upon the completion of their trial. Our future success is dependent on
those channels continuing to drive new members and our ability to convert free
trial members into paying members.

We believe we will see an acceleration of Total Cumulative Platform Uses
relative to Total Cumulative Enrollments over time as our members use our
products across multiple locations and use cases. We believe this dynamic will
grow the long-term economic value of our platform by increasing total
engagement, expanding our margins and maximizing our revenue. Our future success
is dependent upon maintaining and growing our partnerships as well as ensuring
our platform remains compelling to members.

Although we have historically increased the number of new members over time and successfully converted some free trial members to paid members, our future success depends on our continued ability to do so.

Ability to retain CLEAR Plus members


Our ability to execute on our growth strategy is focused, in part, on our
ability to retain our existing CLEAR Plus members. Frequency and recency of
usage are the leading indicators of retention, and we must continue to provide
frictionless and predictable experiences that our members will use in their
daily lives. The value of the CLEAR platform to our members increases as we add
more use cases and partnerships, which in turn drives more frequent usage and
increases retention. Historically, CLEAR Plus members who used CLEAR in both
aviation and non-aviation venues renewed at rates materially above those who
used CLEAR only in aviation. We cannot be sure that we will be successful in
retaining our members due to any number of factors such as our inability to
successfully implement a new product, adoption of our technology, harm to our
brand or other factors.

Ability to add new partners, retain existing partners, and generate new revenue streams


Our partners include local airport authorities, airlines and other businesses.
Our future success depends on maintaining those relationships, adding new
relationships and maintaining favorable business terms. In addition, our growth
strategy relies on creating new revenue streams such as per partner, per member
or per use transaction fees. Although we believe our service provides
significant value to our partners, our success depends on creating mutually
beneficial partnership agreements. We are focused on innovating both our product
and our platform to improve our members' experience, improve safety and security
and introduce new use cases. We intend to accelerate our pace of innovation to
add more features and use cases, to ultimately deliver greater value to our
members and partners. In the near term, we believe that growing our member base
facilitates our ability to add new partnerships and provide additional
offerings, which we expect will lead to revenue generation opportunities in the
long term.

Schedule of launches of new partners, products and locations


Our financial performance is dependent in part on new partner, product and
location launches. In many cases, we cannot predict the exact timing of those
launches. Delays, resulting either from internal or external factors may have a
material effect on our financial results.

Expenditure schedule; Discretionary investments

Although many of our expenses occur in a predictable manner, some expenses may fluctuate from period to period due to timing.


In addition, management may make discretionary investments when it sees an
opportunity to accelerate growth, add a new partner or acquire talent, among
other reasons. This may lead to volatility or unpredictability in our expense
base and in our profitability.

Maintain a strong unitary economy

Our business model is powered by network effects and has historically been characterized by efficient member acquisition and high retention rates. This is evident by our lifetime value of approximately 18 times over our

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Customer Acquisition Cost for CLEAR Plus members who joined during 2021. The
Lifetime Value relative to our Customer Acquisition Cost for CLEAR Plus members
who joined during 2021 is consistent with the average for prior periods. While
we believe our unit economics will remain attractive, this is dependent on our
ability to add new members efficiently and maintain our historically strong
retention rates. As we grow our market penetration, the cost to acquire new
members could increase and the experience we deliver to members could degrade,
causing lower retention rates. For our definitions of "Lifetime Value" and
"Customer Acquisition Cost" and information about how we calculate these
metrics, see the section titled "-Our Member Acquisition and Retention Strategy"
in our Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Macro environment changes


Our business is dependent on macroeconomic and other events outside of our
control, such as decreased levels of travel or attendance at events, terrorism,
civil unrest, political instability, union and other transit related strikes and
other general economic conditions. We are also subject to changes in
discretionary consumer spending.

Impact of the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19)


As the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic subsides and the demand for our services
increases, we expect our expenses to increase, in some cases significantly, in
comparison to the second quarter of 2021 and the 2020 fiscal year when we had
lower staffing needs and proactively reduced our operating expenses. These
increased expenses will include higher cost of direct salaries and benefits
driven by field labor, sales and marketing, research and development costs, and
general and administrative (including costs associated with being a public
company and increased equity-based compensation expense). Due to the nature of
our revenue recognition policy (e.g., CLEAR Plus revenues are recognized over
the life of a subscription, which is typically 12 months), our reported revenues
are expected to lag behind Total Bookings. We may incur net losses and negative
adjusted EBITDA in the long term if we are required to increase expenses to
support our growth. See "Risk Factors-Risks Related to Our Financial
Performance" in our Annual Report on Form-10K.

Reorganization operations


Prior to the completion of our initial public offering ("IPO"), we undertook
certain reorganization transactions (the "Reorganization Transactions") such
that Clear Secure, Inc. is now a holding company, and its sole material asset is
a controlling equity interest in Alclear. As the general partner of Alclear,
Clear Secure, Inc. operates and controls all of the business and affairs of
Alclear, has the obligation to absorb losses and receive benefits from Alclear
and, through Alclear and its subsidiaries, conducts our business.

The Reorganization Transactions were accounted for as a reorganization of
entities under common control. As a result, the consolidated financial
statements of the Company recognized the assets and liabilities received in the
Reorganization Transactions at their historical carrying amounts, as reflected
in the historical financial statements of Alclear. The Company consolidates
Alclear on its consolidated financial statements and records a non-controlling
interest, related to the Alclear non-voting common units ("Alclear Units") held
by our founders and pre-IPO members, on its consolidated balance sheets and
statement of operations. See Note 1 in our condensed consolidated financial
statements for a more detailed discussion of the Reorganization Transactions.

Taxes and expenses


After the consummation of our IPO, we became subject to U.S. federal, state and
local income taxes with respect to our allocable share of any taxable income of
Alclear and will be taxed at the prevailing corporate tax rates. Alclear, is
treated as a flow-through entity for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and as
such, has generally not been subject to U.S. federal income tax at the entity
level. Accordingly, the historical results of operations and other financial
information set forth in the Annual Report on Form 10-K do not include any
material provisions for U.S. federal income tax for the periods prior to our
IPO.

In addition to tax expense, we incur expenses related to our operations, plus
payments under the tax receivable agreement ("TRA") described below, which we
expect to be significant. We intend to cause Alclear to make distributions in an
amount sufficient to allow us to pay our tax obligations and operating expenses,
including distributions to fund any ordinary course payments under the TRA.

Following our IPO, we have and we expect to continue to incur increased amounts
of compensation expense, including related to equity awards granted under the
2021 Omnibus Incentive Plan to both existing employees and newly-hired
employees, and grants in connection with new hires could be significant. In
addition, as a new public company, we are implementing additional procedures and
processes for the purpose of addressing the standards and requirements
applicable to
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Public enterprises. We expect to incur additional expenses related to these steps and, among other things, additional directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, attendance fees, SECONDtransfer agent fees, hiring of additional accounting, legal and administrative staff, increased audit and legal fees and other similar expenses.

Agreement on tax claims


In connection with the IPO we entered into the TRA with the Alclear Investments,
LLC and Alclear Investments II, LLC (collectively, the "Alclear Members") that
provides for the payment by us to the Alclear Members of 85% of the amount of
cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state and local income tax or franchise
tax that we actually realize (computed using simplifying assumptions to address
the impact of state and local taxes) as a result of (i) any increase in tax
basis in Alclear's assets resulting from (a) exchanges by the Alclear Members
(or their transferees or other assignees) of Alclear Units (along with the
corresponding shares of our Class C Common Stock or Class D Common Stock (as
each defined below), as applicable) for shares of our Class A Common Stock,
$0.00001 par value per share ("Class A Common Stock") or Class B Common Stock,
$0.00001 par value per share ("Class B Common Stock") as applicable, and
purchases of Alclear Units and corresponding shares of Class C Common stock, par
value $0.00001 per share ("Class C Common Stock") or Class D Common Stock,
$0.00001 par value per share ("Class D Common Stock" and, together with the
Class A Common Stock, Class B Common Stock and Class C Common Stock,
collectively, "Common Stock"), as the case may be, from Alclear Members (or
their transferees or other assignees) or (b) payments under the TRA, and (ii)
tax benefits related to imputed interest deemed arising as a result of payments
made under the TRA.

The actual increase in tax basis, as well as the amount and timing of any
payments under these agreements, varies depending upon a number of factors,
including the timing of exchanges by or purchases from the Alclear Members, the
price of our Class A Common Stock at the time of the exchange, the extent to
which such exchanges are taxable, the amount and timing of the taxable income we
generate in the future and the tax rate then applicable and the portion of our
payments under the TRA constituting imputed interest. During the six months
ended June 30, 2022, the Company recognized certain exchanges. As of June 30,
2022, the Company did not record a TRA liability as a result of these exchanges.

Acquisitions


During the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company made strategic acquisitions
of Whyline, Inc., our virtual queuing technology that enables customers to
manage lines and certain assets of Atlas Certified, LLC., our automated solution
to verify professional licenses and certification data across industries.
Revenues and operating loss related to these acquisitions were insignificant to
the condensed consolidated financial statements.

Key performance indicators


To evaluate performance of the business, we utilize a variety of other non-GAAP
financial reporting and performance measures. These key measures include Total
Bookings, Total Cumulative Enrollments, Total Cumulative Platform Uses, and
Annual CLEAR Plus Net Member Retention.

Total reservations


Total Bookings represent our total revenue plus the change in deferred revenue
during the period. Total Bookings in any particular period reflect sales to new
and renewing CLEAR Plus subscribers plus any accrued billings to partners.
Management believes that Total Bookings is an important measure of the current
health and growth of the business and views it as a leading indicator.

                                              Three Months Ended                                                      Six Months Ended
                    June 30,           June 30,                                              June 30,          June 30,
                      2022               2021             $ Change             % Change        2022              2021             $ Change            % Change
Total Bookings (in
millions)          $  122.9          $    70.0          $    52.9                     76  % $  230.7          $  132.0          $    98.7                   75  %



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Total Bookings increased by $52.9 million, or 76%, for the three months ended
June 30, 2022 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was
primarily driven by the continued rebound in air travel and continued strength
of our partnership channels, leading to higher new member enrollments and
retention rates.

Total Bookings increased by $98.7 million, or 75%, for the six months ended June
30, 2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was
primarily driven by the continued rebound in air travel and continued strength
of our partnership channels, leading to higher new member enrollments and
retention rates.

Total cumulative registrations


We define Total Cumulative Enrollments as the number of enrollments since
inception as of the end of the period. An Enrollment is defined as any member
who has registered for the CLEAR platform since inception and has a profile
(including limited time free trials regardless of conversion to paid membership)
net of duplicate and/or purged accounts. This includes CLEAR Plus members who
have completed enrollment with CLEAR and have ever activated a payment method,
plus associated family accounts. Management views this metric as an important
tool to analyze the efficacy of our growth and marketing initiatives as new
members are potentially a current and leading indicator of revenues.
                                                                            As of
                                    June 30,                    June 30,
                                      2022                        2021                      Change                % Change
Total Cumulative Enrollments
(in thousands)                       13,097                       6,322                     6,775                   107%


Total Cumulative Enrollments were 13,097 as of June 30, 2022 and 6,322 as of
June 30, 2021, which represented a 107% increase. The year over year growth was
driven by continued strength in air travel and platform (mobile) enrollments.

Total Cumulative Platform Usages


We define Total Cumulative Platform Uses as the number of individual engagements
across CLEAR use cases, including in-airport verifications, since inception as
of the end of the period. We also include airport lounge access verifications,
sports and entertainment venue verifications and Health Pass surveys since
inception as of the end of the period. Management views this metric as an
important tool to analyze the level of engagement of our member base which can
be a leading indicator of future growth, retention and revenue.

                                                                           As of
                                     June 30,                    June 30,
                                       2022                        2021                    Change                % Change
Total Cumulative Platform
Uses (in thousands)                  106,631                      65,503                   41,128                   63%



Total Cumulative Platform Uses was 106,631 as of June 30, 2022 and 65,503 as of
June 30, 2021, which represented a 63% increase, driven by CLEAR Plus
verifications in connection with a rebound in air travel, and continuing use of
Health Pass and Digital Vaccine Pass at large events and return to work for
enterprise partners.

Annual retention of CLEAR Plus Net members


We define Annual CLEAR Plus Net Member Retention as one minus the CLEAR Plus net
member churn on a rolling 12 month basis. We define "CLEAR Plus net member
churn" as total cancellations net of winbacks in the trailing 12 month period
divided by the average active CLEAR Plus members as of the beginning of each
month within the same 12 month period. Winbacks are defined as reactivated
members who have been cancelled for at least 60 days. Active CLEAR Plus members
are defined as members who have completed enrollment with CLEAR and have ever
activated a payment method for our in-airport CLEAR Plus service, including
their registered family plan members. Active CLEAR Plus members also include
those in a grace period of up to 45 days after a billing failure during which
time we attempt to collect updated payment information. Management views this
metric as an important tool to analyze the level of engagement of our member
base, which can be a leading indicator of future growth and revenue, as well as
an indicator of customer satisfaction and long term business economics.
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                                                             As of
                                           June 30,         June 30,
                                             2022             2021            Change
Annual CLEAR Plus Net Member Retention       94.3%            80.6%         

13.7%



Annual CLEAR Plus Net Member Retention was 94.3% as of June 30, 2022 and 80.6%
as of June 30, 2021, a year-over year increase of 1,370 basis points. The
performance was driven by strength in gross renewals and winbacks of previously
cancelled members.
Non-GAAP Financial Measures

In addition to our results as determined in accordance with GAAP, we disclose
Adjusted EBITDA, Free Cash Flow, Adjusted Net Income (Loss) and Adjusted Net
Income (Loss) Per Common Share, Diluted as non-GAAP financial measures that
management believes provide useful information to investors. These measures are
not financial measures calculated in accordance with GAAP and should not be
considered as a substitute for net income (loss), net cash provided by (used in)
operating activities or any other operating performance measure calculated in
accordance with GAAP, and may not be comparable to a similarly titled measure
reported by other companies. Our non-GAAP financial measures are expressed in
thousands.

Adjusted EBITDA

We define Adjusted EBITDA (Loss) as net income (loss) adjusted for income taxes,
interest (income) expense net, depreciation and amortization, losses on asset
disposals, equity-based compensation expense, mark to market of warrant
liabilities, other income (expense), net, acquisition-related costs and changes
in fair value of contingent consideration. Adjusted EBITDA (Loss) is an
important financial measure used by management and our board of directors in
determining performance-based compensation for our management and key employees.

Adjusted net profit (loss)


We define Adjusted Net Income (Loss) as Net income (loss) attributable to Clear
Secure, Inc. adjusted for the net income (loss) attributable to non-controlling
interests, equity-based compensation expense, amortization of acquired
intangible assets, acquisition-related costs, changes in fair value of
contingent consideration and the income tax effect of these adjustments.
Adjusted Net Income (Loss) is used in the calculation of Adjusted Net Income
(Loss) per Common Share as defined below.

Adjusted net earnings (loss) per common share


We compute Adjusted Net Income (Loss) Per Common Share, Basic as Adjusted Net
Income (Loss) divided by Adjusted Weighted-Average Shares Outstanding for our
Class A Common Stock, Class B Common Stock, Class C Common Stock and Class D
Common Stock assuming the exchange of all vested and outstanding common units in
Alclear at the end of each period presented. We do not present Adjusted Net
Income (Loss) per Common Share for shares of our Class B Common Stock although
they are participating securities based on the assumed conversion of those
shares to our Class A Common Stock. We do not present Adjusted Net Income (Loss)
per Common Share on a dilutive basis for periods where we have Adjusted Net Loss
since we do not assume the conversion of any potentially dilutive equity
instruments as the result would be antidilutive. In periods where we have
Adjusted Net Income, the Company also calculates Adjusted Net Income (Loss) Per
Common Share, Diluted based on the effect of potentially dilutive equity
instruments for the periods presented using the treasury stock/if-converted
method, as applicable. Adjusted Net Income (Loss) per Common Share is only
applicable for periods after June 29, 2021, post the Reorganization Transactions
and IPO.

Adjusted Net Income (Loss) and Adjusted Earnings (Loss) Per Common Share
exclude, to the extent applicable, the tax effected impact of non-cash expenses
and other items that are not directly related to our core operations. These
items are excluded because they are connected to the Company's long term growth
plan and not intended to increase short term revenue in a specific period.
Further, to the extent that other companies use similar methods in calculating
non-GAAP measures, the provision of supplemental non-GAAP information can allow
for a comparison of the company's relative performance against other companies
that also report non-GAAP operating results.

Free movement of capital

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We define Free Cash Flow as net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
adjusted for purchases of property and equipment plus the value of share
repurchases over fair value. With regards to our CLEAR Plus subscription
service, we generally collect cash from our members upfront for annual
subscriptions. As a result, when the business is growing, Free Cash Flow can be
a real time indicator of the current trajectory of the business.

See below for reconciliations of these non-GAAP financial measures to their most comparable GAAP measures.

Reconciliation of Net Earnings (Net Loss) to Adjusted EBITDA (Loss):

                                        Three Months Ended             Six Months Ended
                                     June 30,       June 30,       June 30,       June 30,
(In thousands)                         2022           2021           2022           2021
Net loss                            $ (12,323)     $ (38,099)     $ (31,117)     $ (51,227)
Income tax expense (benefit)             (147)           211            155            217
Interest (income) expense, net           (187)           142           (194)           213
Other (income) expense, net              (465)             -           (197)             -
Depreciation and amortization           4,328          2,664          8,712 

5,202

Stock-based compensation expense 12,307 5,897 25,436

         7,216
Warrant liabilities                         -         10,903              -         12,796
Adjusted EBITDA (Loss)              $   3,513      $ (18,282)     $   2,795      $ (25,583)

Reconciliation of Net Earnings (Net Loss) to Adjusted Net Earnings (Net Loss)

                                                    Three Months Ended                     Six Months Ended
                                               June 30,            June 30,           June 30,           June 30,
(In thousands)                                   2022                2021               2022               2021

Net loss attributable to ClearSecure, Inc. ($7,155) $(2,004)

         $ (17,482)         $  (2,004)
Reallocation of net loss attributable to
non-controlling interests                        (5,168)            (2,375)           (13,635)            (2,375)
Net loss per above                              (12,323)            (4,379)           (31,117)            (4,379)
Equity-based compensation expense                12,307              3,913             25,436              3,913
Amortization of acquired intangibles                711                  -              1,580                  -
Income tax effect                                  (203)                 -               (405)                 -
Adjusted Net Income (Loss)                   $      492          $    (466)         $  (4,506)         $    (466)


Calculation of adjusted weighted average of outstanding shares Basic

                                                                                         Three Months Ended
                                                                            June 30, 2022                   June 30, 2021

Weighted average number of shares outstanding, basic for Class A common shares

                                                                 79,420,204                      57,371,788

Adjustments

Assumed weighted average conversion of issued and outstanding Class B common shares

                                                                  1,042,234                       1,042,234

Assumed weighted average conversion of the issued and outstanding Class C common Store

                                                                 41,892,237                      44,407,609

Assumed weighted average conversion of issued and outstanding Class D common shares

                                                                 26,705,315                      24,756,018

Assumed weighted average conversion of vested and outstanding warrants

     194,108                       2,431,206
Adjusted Weighted-Average Number of Shares Outstanding, Basic               149,254,098                     130,008,855



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                                                                                        Six Months Ended
                                                                            June 30, 2022                 June 30, 2021

Weighted average number of shares outstanding, basic for Class A common shares

                                                                 78,053,957                      57,371,788

Adjustments

Assumed weighted average conversion of issued and outstanding Class B common shares

                                                                  1,042,234                       1,042,234

Assumed weighted average conversion of the issued and outstanding Class C common Store

                                                                 42,940,757                      44,407,609

Assumed weighted average conversion of issued and outstanding Class D common shares

                                                                 26,705,365                      24,756,018

Assumed weighted average conversion of vested and outstanding warrants

     178,619                       2,431,206
Adjusted Weighted-Average Number of Shares Outstanding, Basic               148,920,932                     130,008,855



Calculation of adjusted basic net earnings (loss) per common share

                                             Three Months Ended                                           Six Months Ended
                                  June 30,                       June 30,                      June 30,                      June 30,
                                    2022                           2021                          2022                          2021
Adjusted net income
(loss)                                       492                           (466)                      (4,506)                          (466)
Adjusted
weighted-average number
of shares outstanding,
basic                                149,254,098                    130,008,855                  148,920,932                    130,008,855
Adjusted Net Income
(Loss) per Common
Share, Basic                                    $0.00                          $0.00                      $(0.03)                          $0.00


Calculation of adjusted net earnings (loss) per common share, diluted

                                                                                 Three Months Ended
                                                                                      June 30,
                                                                                        2022
Adjusted net income                                                                           492
Adjusted weighted-average number of shares outstanding, basic               

149 254 098

Weighted-average impact of unvested RSA's                                               1,213,374
Weighted-average impact of unvested RSU's                                                 642,547
Total                                                                       

151 110 019

Adjusted Net Income per Common Share, Diluted:                                                      $0.00



As noted above, since the Company incurred an adjusted net loss for certain periods presented, the Company has not calculated the adjusted, diluted weighted average number of shares outstanding for those periods, as the result would be anti-dilutive. .

Below is a summary of the company’s adjusted net earnings (loss) per share:

                                                    Three Months Ended                              Six Months Ended
                                            June 30,                 June 30,               June 30,                 June 30,
                                              2022                     2021                   2022                     2021
Adjusted net loss per common share,
basic                                              $0.00                    $0.00                $(0.03)                    $0.00
Adjusted net income (loss) per common
share, diluted                                     $0.00                    $0.00                $(0.03)                    $0.00


Reconciliation of net cash provided by operating activities to Free Cash Flow:

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                                                 Three Months Ended            Six Months Ended
                                               June 30,       June 30,      June 30,      June 30,
(In thousands)                                   2022           2021          2022          2021
Net cash provided by operating activities    $   50,923      $  3,419      $ 75,855      $   3,084
Purchases of property and equipment              (9,681)       (6,416)      (15,214)       (15,210)
Share repurchases over fair value                     -             -             -            712
Free Cash Flow                               $   41,242      $ (2,997)     $ 60,641      $ (11,414)

Components of operating results

Revenue


The Company derives substantially all of its revenue from subscriptions to its
consumer aviation service, CLEAR Plus. The Company offers certain limited-time
free trials, family pricing, and other beneficial pricing through several
channels, including airline and credit card partnerships. Membership
subscription revenue is presented net of taxes, refunds, credit card
chargebacks, and estimated amounts due to a credit card partner.

The Company also generates revenue in relation to sports stadiums and Health
Pass which are and historically have been immaterial to our results. Sports
stadium revenues consist of fees for use of the Company's pods for security
entry at various venues as well as access for members to dedicated entry lanes
at various sports stadiums across the country. Additionally, the Company
generates revenue from transaction fees charged either per use or per user over
a predefined time period, which may include one-time implementation fees,
platform licensing fees, hardware-leasing fees or incremental transaction fees.

Functionnary costs


The Company's expenses consist of cost of revenue share fees, cost of direct
salaries and benefits, research and development, sales and marketing, general
and administrative expenses and depreciation and amortization expenses.

Revenue Cost Sharing Fee


The Company operates as a concessionaire in airports and shares a portion of the
gross receipts generated from the Company's members with the host airports and
airlines ("Revenue Share"). The Revenue Share fee is generally prepaid to the
host airport in the period collected from the member. The Revenue Share fee is
capitalized and subsequently amortized to operating expense over each member's
subscription period, as the payments are refundable on a pro rata basis. Such
prepayments are recorded in "Prepaid Revenue Share fee" in the Company's
condensed consolidated balance sheets. Cost of Revenue Share Fee also includes a
fixed fee component which is expensed in the period incurred and certain
overhead related expenses paid to the airports in relation to our Revenue Share
arrangements.

Cost of direct salaries and benefits


Cost of direct salaries and benefits includes employee-related expenses and
allocated overhead associated with our field ambassadors directly assisting
members and their corresponding travel related costs. Employee-related costs
recorded in direct salaries and benefits consist of salaries, taxes, benefits
and equity-based compensation. Such amounts are direct costs of services and are
recorded in "Cost of direct salaries and benefits" in the Company's condensed
consolidated statement of operations.

Research and development


Research and development expenses consist primarily of employee related
expenses, allocated overhead costs and costs for contractors related to the
Company's development of new products and services and improving existing
products and services. Research and development costs are generally expensed as
incurred, except for costs incurred in connection with the development of
internal-use software that qualify for capitalization as described in our
internal-use software policy. Employee-related expenses consist of salaries,
taxes, benefits and equity-based compensation.

Sales and Marketing

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Sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of costs of general marketing and
promotional activities, advertising fees used to drive subscriber acquisition,
commissions, the production costs to create our advertisements, expenses related
to employees who manage our marketing and brand and allocated overhead costs.

General and administrative


General and administrative expenses consist primarily of employee-related
expenses for the executive, finance, accounting, legal, and human resources
functions. Employee-related expenses consist of salaries, taxes, benefits and
equity-based compensation. General and administrative costs also include the
Company's warrant expense and changes in the fair value of contingent
consideration. In addition, general and administrative expenses include
non-personnel costs, such as legal, accounting and other professional fees,
variable credit card fees and variable mobile enrollment costs, and and all
other supporting corporate expenses not allocated to other departments.

Interest income, net


Interest Income, net consists of interest income from our investment holdings
partially offset by interest expense, which primarily includes amortization of
discounts on our marketable securities and issuance costs on our revolving
credit facility.

Other income (expenses), net

Other income (expense), net includes certain non-recurring non-operating items, including income recognized in connection with a minimum annual guarantee paid to us by a business partner and the impairment of long-lived assets.

Provision for income taxes


As a result of the IPO and Reorganization, the Company became the sole managing
member of Alclear, which is treated as a partnership for U.S. federal and most
applicable state and local income tax purposes. As a partnership, Alclear is not
subject to U.S. federal and most state and local income taxes. Any taxable
income or loss generated by Alclear is passed through to and included in the
taxable income or loss of its members, including the Company, based on ownership
interest. The Company is subject to U.S. federal income taxes, in addition to
state and local income taxes with respect to its allocable share of any taxable
income or loss of Alclear, as well as any stand-alone income or loss generated
by the Company. The Company is also subject to income taxes in Israel,
Argentina, and Mexico.

Comparison of the three and six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 (in
millions):

                                                         Three Months Ended
                                         June 30,      June 30,
                                           2022          2021        $ Change       % Change
Revenue                                 $  102.7      $   55.2      $    47.5           86  %
Operating expenses:
Cost of revenue share fee               $   12.3      $    8.3      $     4.0           48  %
Cost of direct salaries and benefits    $   25.3      $   15.8      $     9.5           60  %
Research and development                $   14.3      $   10.9      $     3.4           31  %
Sales and marketing                     $   11.4      $   10.9      $     0.5            5  %
General and administrative              $   48.2      $   44.3      $     3.9            9  %
Depreciation and amortization           $    4.3      $    2.7      $     1.6           59  %
Operating loss                          $  (13.1)     $  (37.7)     $    24.6          (65) %
Other income (expense)
Interest income (expense), net          $    0.2      $   (0.1)     $     0.3             N/A
Other income (expense), net             $    0.5      $      -      $     0.5             N/A
Income (loss) before tax                $  (12.4)     $  (37.8)     $    25.4          (67) %
Income tax benefit (expense)            $    0.1      $   (0.2)     $     0.3             N/A
Net income (loss)                       $  (12.3)     $  (38.0)     $    25.7          (68) %



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                                                          Six Months Ended
                                         June 30,      June 30,
                                           2022          2021        $ Change       % Change
Revenue                                 $  193.3      $  105.7      $    87.6           83  %
Operating expenses:
Cost of revenue share fee               $   24.5      $   16.1      $     8.4           52  %
Cost of direct salaries and benefits    $   48.3      $   28.0      $    20.3           73  %
Research and development                $   29.8      $   19.9      $     9.9           50  %
Sales and marketing                     $   19.2      $   15.9      $     3.3           21  %
General and administrative              $   94.1      $   71.5      $    22.6           32  %
Depreciation and amortization           $    8.7      $    5.2      $     3.5           67  %
Operating loss                          $  (31.4)     $  (50.9)     $    19.5          (38) %
Other income (expense)
Interest income (expense), net          $    0.2      $   (0.2)     $     0.4             N/A
Other income (expense), net             $    0.2      $      -      $     0.2             N/A
Income (loss) before tax                $  (31.0)     $  (51.1)     $    20.1          (39) %
Income tax benefit (expense)            $   (0.2)     $   (0.2)     $       -             N/A
Net income (loss)                       $  (31.2)     $  (51.3)     $    20.1          (39) %

Information on our results of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 is shown below.


Revenue

                              Three Months Ended                                     Six Months Ended
             June 30,      June 30,                                 June 30,      June 30,
               2022          2021         $ Change       % Change     2022          2021        $ Change       % Change
Revenue     $  102.7      $    55.2      $    47.5           86  % $  193.3      $  105.7      $    87.6           83  %



Revenue increased by $47.5 million, or 86%, for the three months ended June 30,
2022 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was
primarily due to an 85% increase in the number of average CLEAR Plus members and
a 1,370 bps increase in Annual CLEAR Plus Net Member Retention. Approximately
30% and 28% of paying CLEAR Plus members in the three months ended June 30, 2022
and 2021, respectively, were on a family plan as of June 30, 2022.

Revenue increased by $87.6 million, or 83%, for the six months ended June 30,
2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was primarily
due to a 79% increase in the number of average CLEAR Plus members 1,370 bps
increase in Annual CLEAR Plus Net Member Retention. Approximately 30% and 28% of
paying CLEAR Plus members in the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021,
respectively, were on a family plan as of June 30, 2022.

Revenue Cost Sharing Fee

                                              Three Months Ended                                                        Six Months Ended
                     June 30,           June 30,                                               June 30,           June 30,
                       2022               2021             $ Change             % Change         2022               2021             $ Change            % Change
Cost of revenue
share fee          $    12.3          $     8.3          $     4.0                     48  % $    24.5          $    16.1          $     8.4                   52  %



Cost of revenue share fee increased by $4.0 million, or 48%, for the three
months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2021. The
change was driven by an increase of $0.7 million due to a 26% increase in fixed
airport fees and $3.3 million due to a 59% increase in per member fees, and
partially offset by a $0.9 million non-recurring benefit.

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Cost of revenue share fee increased by $8.4 million, or 52%, for the six months
ended June 30, 2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021. The change
was driven by an increase of $1.5 million due to a 31% increase in fixed airport
fees and $6.9 million due to a 61% increase in per member fees, and partially
offset by a $0.9 million non-recurring benefit.

Cost of salaries and direct benefits

                                                Three Months Ended                                                        Six Months Ended
                       June 30,           June 30,                                               June 30,           June 30,
                         2022               2021             $ Change             % Change         2022               2021             $ Change            % Change
Cost of direct
salaries and
benefits             $    25.3          $    15.8          $     9.5                   60.1  % $    48.3          $    28.0          $    20.3                   73  %


Cost of direct salaries and benefits expenses increased by $9.5 million, or 60%,
for the three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the three months ended June
30, 2021. The change was primarily due to increased employee compensation costs
of $8.9 million caused by increasing travel volumes leading to higher staffing
needs.

Cost of direct salaries and benefits increased by $20.3 million, or 73%, for the
six months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021.
The change was primarily due to increased employee compensation costs of $19.3
million caused by increasing travel volumes leading to higher staffing needs.

Research and development

                                                        Three Months Ended                                                        Six Months Ended
                               June 30,           June 30,                                               June 30,           June 30,
                                 2022               2021             $ Change             % Change         2022               2021             $ Change            % Change

Research and development $14.3 $10.9 $3.4

                     31  % $    29.8          $    19.9          $     9.9                   50  %


Research and development expenses increased by $3.4 million, or 31%, for the
three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the three months ended June 30,
2021. The change was primarily due to an increase of $3.9 million of
employee-related expenses, including equity-based compensation costs, partially
offset by a decrease of $0.6 million for professional fees.

Research and development expenses increased by $9.9 million, or 50%, for the six
months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021. The
change was primarily due to an increase of $10.8 million of employee-related
expenses, including equity-based compensation costs, partially offset by a
decrease of $1.3 million for professional fees.

Sales and marketing

                                                      Three Months Ended                                                        Six Months Ended
                             June 30,           June 30,                                               June 30,           June 30,
                               2022               2021             $ Change             % Change         2022               2021             $ Change            % Change
Sales and marketing        $    11.4          $    10.9          $     0.5                      5  % $    19.2          $    15.9          $     3.3                   21  %



Sales and marketing expenses increased by $0.5 million, or 5%, for the three
months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2021. The
change was driven primarily by increased ambassador commission expense of $3.6
million due to higher new member enrollments, partially offset by a $2.8 million
decrease in discretionary marketing expenses and a $0.5 million decrease for
professional fees.

Sales and marketing expenses increased by $3.3 million, or 21%, for the six
months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021. The
change was driven primarily by increased ambassador commission expense of $6.6
million due to higher new member enrollments and a $0.7 million increase for
employee-related expenses, including equity-
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based compensation costs, partially offset by a $3.8 million decrease in discretionary marketing expenses and a $0.5 million reduction in professional fees.

general and administrative

                                                          Three Months Ended                                                        Six Months Ended
                                 June 30,           June 30,                                               June 30,           June 30,
                                   2022               2021             $ Change             % Change         2022               2021             $ Change            % Change
General and administrative     $    48.2          $    44.3          $     3.9                      9  % $    94.1          $    71.5          $    22.6                   32  %



General and administrative expenses increased by $3.9 million, or 9%, for the
three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the three months ended June 30,
2021. The change was primarily driven by a $2.2 million increase for technology
related costs and a $2.0 million increase in credit card fees related to higher
enrollments. Additionally, employee-related expenses increased by $11.3 million,
including equity-based compensation costs, offset by an decrease in non-employee
equity-based compensation costs of $12.6 million, which included a reduction in
the mark to market of warrant liabilities of $10.9 million.

General and administrative expenses increased by $22.6 million, or 32%, for the
six months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021.
The change was primarily driven by a $25.1 million increase in employee-related
expenses, including equity-based compensation costs, offset by an decrease in
non-employee equity-based compensation costs of $14.7 million, which included a
reduction in the mark to market of warrant liabilities of $12.8 million.
Additionally, technology costs increased by $4.6 million, credit card fees
increased by $4.1 million related to higher enrollments, and insurance costs
increased by $2.0 million. These increases were partially offset by a decrease
in professional fees for $1.7 million.

Non-operating income (expenses)

                                                     Three Months Ended                                                      Six Months Ended
                             June 30,           June 30,                                             June 30,           June 30,
                               2022               2021             $ Change            % Change        2022               2021             $ Change           % Change
Interest Income, net       $     0.2          $    (0.1)         $     0.3                     N/A $     0.2          $    (0.2)         $     0.4                   N/A



Interest income, net increased by $0.3 million, for the three months ended June
30, 2022 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was
driven by higher interest income on our marketable securities, partially offset
by higher amortization of discounts on our marketable securities.

Interest income, net increased by $0.4 million, for the six months ended June
30, 2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was driven
by higher interest income on marketable securities, partially offset by higher
amortization of discounts on our marketable securities.

                                                Three Months Ended                                                       Six Months Ended
                       June 30,             June 30,                                             June 30,           June 30,
                         2022                 2021             $ Change            % Change        2022               2021             $ Change           % Change
Other income        $    0.5              $       -          $     0.5                     N/A $     0.5          $       -          $     0.5                   N/A
Other expense       $      -              $       -          $       -                     N/A $    (0.3)         $       -          $    (0.3)                  N/A
Other income
(expense), net      $    0.5              $       -          $     0.5                     N/A $     0.2          $       -          $     0.2                   N/A


Other income (expenses), net increased by $0.5 millionfor the three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2021. The variation is mainly explained by a non-recurring customer payment for $0.5 million.

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Other income (expense), net decreased by $0.2 million, for the six months ended
June 30, 2022 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2021. The change was
primarily driven by a non-recurring customer settlement for $0.5 million,
partially offset by an impairment of long-lived assets during the current year.

Income tax benefit (expense)
                                             Three Months Ended                                                      Six Months Ended
                     June 30,           June 30,                                             June 30,           June 30,
                       2022               2021             $ Change            % Change        2022               2021             $ Change           % Change
Income tax benefit
(expense)          $     0.1          $    (0.2)         $     0.3                     N/A $    (0.2)         $    (0.2)         $       -                   N/A



Income tax benefit increased by $0.3 million for the three months ended June 30,
2022 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2021. The change was primarily
due to the impact of state and foreign taxes.

There was no change in income tax profit/(expense) for the six months ended
June 30, 2022 compared to the half-year ended June 30, 2021.

Cash and capital resources

Our operations have been funded primarily through equity financing and cash flow from operations. Of the June 30, 2022we had cash and cash equivalents of $339.7 million and negotiable securities of $333.9 million.


Historically, our principal uses of cash and cash equivalents have included
funding our operations, capital expenditures, repurchases of members' equity and
more recently, business combinations that enhance our strategic positioning. We
may also use our cash and cash equivalents to repurchase our Class A Common
Stock. We plan to finance our operations and capital expenditures largely
through cash generated from the proceeds of our IPO and operations. We believe
our existing cash and cash equivalents, marketable securities, cash provided by
operations and the availability of additional funds under our Credit Agreement
(as defined below) will be sufficient to meet our working capital and capital
expenditure needs for at least the next 12 months, including known commitments
and contingencies as discussed below. Future capital expenditure will generally
relate to building enhancements to the functionality of our current platform,
equipment, leasehold improvements and furniture and fixtures related to office
expansion and relocation, and general corporate infrastructure. We have planned
capital expenditures related to the build out of our new office space of
approximately $16.5 million in the next 12 months. As is the case with any
large-scale construction project, the timing and amounts of these expenditures
are subject to uncertainty.

On May 13, 2022, the Company's Board authorized a share repurchase program
pursuant to which the Company may purchase up to $100,000 of its Class A Common
Stock. Under the repurchase program, the Company may purchase shares of its
Class A Common Stock on a discretionary basis from time to time through open
market repurchases, privately negotiated transactions, or other means, including
through Rule 10b5-1 trading plans. The timing and actual number of shares
repurchased will be determined by management depending on a variety of factors,
including stock price, trading volume, market conditions, and other general
business considerations. The repurchase program has no expiration date and may
be modified, suspended, or terminated at any time. No shares have been
repurchased to date during the period covered by this report.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, our operations have been, and we expect
they will continue to be, adversely impacted by government mandated regulations,
and the social distancing practices and health concerns of our guests and
employees. In light of the evolving nature of COVID-19 and the uncertainty it
has produced around the world, we do not believe it is possible to predict the
cumulative and ultimate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our future business,
results of operations and financial condition. See "Risk Factors-Risk Related to
Our Business, Brand and Operations-The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted, and may
continue to impact, our business, results of operations and financial condition"
in our Annual Report on Form 10-K.

credit agreement

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On March 31, 2020, we entered into a credit agreement (the "Credit Agreement")
for a three-year $50 million revolving credit facility that expires on March 31,
2023. Borrowings under the Credit Agreement generally will bear interest between
1.5% and 2.5% per year and will also include interest based on the greater of
the prime rate, LIBOR or New York Federal Reserve Bank ("NYFRB") rate, plus an
applicable margin for specific interest periods. In April 2021, the Company
increased the size of the revolving credit facility to $100 million. As of
June 30, 2022, we had not drawn on the revolving credit facility and did not
have outstanding borrowings under the Credit Agreement.

We have the option to repay any borrowings under the Credit Agreement without
premium or penalty prior to maturity. In addition, the Credit Agreement contains
certain other covenants (none of which relate to financial condition), events of
default and other customary provisions, and also contains customary LIBOR
replacement mechanics. The Credit Agreement contains customary affirmative
covenants, such as financial statement reporting requirements and delivery of
borrowing base certificates, as well as customary covenants that restrict our
ability to, among other things, incur additional indebtedness, sell certain
assets, guarantee obligations of third parties, declare dividends or make
certain distributions, and undergo a merger or consolidation or certain other
transactions.

To June 30, 2022the Company complied with all financial and non-financial covenants of the credit agreement.

Cash flow

Here is a summary of our cash flow for the six months ended June 30, 2022
and June 30, 2021 (in millions):

Semester completed

                                                         June 30, 2022                June 30, 2021              $ Change
Net cash provided by operating activities                    $75.8                         $3.1                   $72.7
Net cash used in investing activities                       ($15.5)                      ($15.5)                    $-

Net cash (used) provided by financing activities ($0.3)

               $64.6                  ($64.9)
Net increase in cash, cash equivalents, and
restricted cash                                              $60.0                        $52.2                    $7.8
Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash,
beginning of year                                            $309.1                       $139.1                  $170.0

Net exchange differences on cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash

                                          ($0.1)                         $-                    ($0.1)

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, end of period

                                                       $369.0                       $191.3                  $177.7


Cash flow from operating activities


For the six months ended June 30, 2022, net cash provided by operating
activities was $75.8 million compared to net cash provided by operating
activities of $3.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021, an increase
of $72.7 million due to favorable changes in working capital of $40.5 million
primarily related to prepaid and other current assets, accrued liabilities and
deferred revenue. Additionally, there was a decrease in net loss of $20.1
million and an increase in non-cash adjustments to net loss of $12.1 million.

Cash flow from investing activities

For the six months ended June 30, 2022 and the six months ended June 30, 2021net cash used in investing activities remained stable at $15.5 million. Cash flow from financing activities


For the six months ended June 30, 2022, net cash used in financing activities
was $0.3 million compared to net cash provided by financing activities of $64.6
million for the six months ended June 30, 2021, a decrease of $64.9 million. The
change was primarily due to a decrease of $80.3 million in the proceeds from the
issuance of members'units offset by a decrease in amounts used to repurchase
member's deficit of $11.7 million and a decrease in distribution to members of
$4.0 million.

Commitments and Contingencies

                                       45
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We have non-cancelable operating lease arrangements for office space. As of June
30, 2022, we had future minimum payments of $32.3 million, with $2.3 million due
in 2022. See Note 8 within the condensed consolidated financial statements for
information related to our lease obligations.

On November 4, 2021, the Company entered into a lease of an office building to
house the Company's corporate headquarters. The Lease Agreement provides for a
commencement on the later of October 1, 2022 or the date on which the Landlord
delivers possession of the premises with certain agreed upon improvements to be
made by the Landlord completed. The term of the Lease Agreement is fifteen years
after the date that rent obligations begin, with an option to renew for one
5-year or 10-year period at Fair Market Value (as defined in the Lease
Agreement) by providing the Landlord with 18 months' notice and certain other
requirements. The aggregate undiscounted future minimum lease payments are
approximately $177.5 million.

We enter into agreements with airports for access to floor and office space. As
of June 30, 2022, we had future minimum payments of $36.8 million. See Note 19
within the condensed consolidated financial statements.

The Company has commitments for future marketing expenditures at sports stadiums in $2.1 million of the June 30, 2022.

The Company is subject to certain minimum expenditure commitments of approximately
$11.7 million over the next two years under service arrangements.

Significant Accounting Policies and Estimates


The preparation of the condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity
with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America
requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported
amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosures of contingent assets and
liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of
revenues and expenses during the reported periods. The Securities and Exchange
Commission ("SEC") has defined a company's critical accounting policies as the
ones that are most important to the portrayal of a company's financial condition
and results of operations, and which require a company to make its most
difficult and subjective judgments. Based on this definition, we have identified
the critical accounting policies and judgments addressed below. We base our
estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we
believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from
these estimates.

Tax Receivable Agreement

The Company entered into a Tax Receivable Agreement ("TRA") which generally
provides for payment by the Company to the remaining members of Alclear, the
"TRA Holders," of 85% of the net cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state
and local income tax and franchise tax that the Company actually realizes or is
deemed to realize in certain circumstances. The Company will retain the benefit
of the remaining 15% of these net cash savings. As of June 30, 2022, the Company
did not record a liability from the TRA.

Business combinations


Accounting for business combinations requires us to make significant estimates
and assumptions with respect to the the fair value of identifiable assets and
liabilities acquired in a business combination, especially with respect to
intangible assets. The initial fair values recorded are subject to adjustments
for up to one year after the closing date of the acquisition to reflect final
valuations.

Recent accounting pronouncements

See Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies in the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, for recently issued accounting pronouncements and their expected impact.

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Bitcoin Blockchain Inspires Kenya Electoral Council to Implement Transparent Voting System https://aspect-sdm.org/bitcoin-blockchain-inspires-kenya-electoral-council-to-implement-transparent-voting-system/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 17:43:18 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/bitcoin-blockchain-inspires-kenya-electoral-council-to-implement-transparent-voting-system/

Kenyans held national elections on Tuesday, August 9, 2022, and the voting system closely mirrored Bitcoin
BTC
blockchain. African governments have traditionally held chaotic elections plagued by gross misconduct and outright electoral fraud. The election, however, was the most transparent system I have ever seen or heard of, thanks to the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission of Kenya (IEBC).

The comparison between the Bitcoin blockchain and the Kenyan voting system used in September 2022 is impressive. To begin with, all polling stations were divided into 46,229 units, and the votes cast at any polling station were counted, signed and accepted as a permanent record. This compares to the Bitcoin network, which has around 14,951 decentralized nodes spread across the globe, according to Bitcoin analytics firm Bitnodes.

The system combines manual and electronic transmission systems to ensure safety. The Kenya Integrated Election Management System (KIE
KIE
MS) biometric device scans the signed forms with QR code from each polling station and sends the copy to the IEBC servers for analysis and reporting. Physical ballots in ballot boxes serve as a verification protocol, while signed physical forms serve as signed transactions.

The IEBC would then act as a third party, collecting and analyzing data from these polling stations. This includes manually collecting all signed ballot forms, verifying them with the returning officer and electronic copy, and counting them within seven days of the election to announce the official winners. At the time of writing this report, the IEBC had received and verified 46,193 of the 46,229 presidential election forms and was awaiting the remaining 36 forms so that the election results could be announced.

This compares to the ease with which blockchain analysis companies like Chainalysis are able to query Bitcoin blockchain data and publish insights.


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The consensus mechanism is different from that of Bitcoin. Political party representatives would monitor the entire voting process at a polling station immediately after the voting window closes, count each vote, and sign the record in the electoral system. This copy, once signed, would be a permanent record. IEBC representatives would then send an electronic copy of the signed form to IEBC headquarters, followed by the physical form at the same location. To ensure transparency, party representatives would also send a copy to their party headquarters.

If this copied Bitcoin, a signed copy of the form would be sent to other nodes to update all copies.

Each polling station has a maximum of 700 registered voters. The number of voters in the polling station would either be the number of people who voted or the number of people who voted before the voting window closed. This means that each record contains 700 entries. By comparison, Bitcoin’s block size is one megabyte per block.

To successfully vote, a voter had to bring an original copy of their national ID card, go to their registered polling station and log in using an IEBC biometric scanner. To sign a Bitcoin transaction, one must have a public address (similar to an ID card) and a private key (compared to fingerprints on the biometric scanner).

When IEBC Headquarters receives and verifies a form from a polling station, the form is posted on its website as an official copy. Voters, party officials, media and aspirants can download and compare this data to their own copy of the polling station. They can also count votes to determine election winners before the IEBC releases the official results.

This compares to the public nature of the Bitcoin ledger, where anyone can query any Bitcoin transaction and see its address.

Once a voter logs into a polling place using biometrics, the device sends an electronic signature to IEBC servers, notifying them that the citizen has voted. Although this solves the problem of double voting, the Bitcoin blockchain solves the problem of double spending.

The votes are stored on the IEBC database in the voting system, and the user only has to sign them. That is to say, the information of each registered voter is recorded and he only goes to the polling station on the day of the election to sign that such is his preferred candidate. Bitcoins are stored in the Bitcoin Network ledger and you only use your private keys to sign that your bitcoins are moved to a specific public address.

To win the Kenyan presidential elections, it is necessary to obtain 50% of the votes cast plus one. This means that if someone wanted to steal the election, they would have to manipulate data from 50% of the polls plus one. This would require a significant investment in terms of resources, but it would ensure the security of the electoral system.

If one or more people wanted to hack the Bitcoin network, they would need to control 50% of the nodes plus one. This would require a massive gathering of resources, firmly establishing Bitcoin as the most secure monetary network in the world.

If a region goes offline or the voting process is interrupted, the other regions will still vote transparently and the missing data will be added after the bottleneck is addressed. In Bitcoin, if some miners or users are offline, their coins are still on-chain and their transactions are added to the blockchain once they are online.

IEBC designed the system to minimize trust and allow voters to verify all records, while Bitcoin’s infrastructure is designed to eliminate trust and allow users to verify. In Bitcoin, the collective nodes are the single point of failure, just like the collective polling stations are the single point of failure of the IEBC voting system.

On the Bitcoin network, once a transaction is signed, it is final, verifiable, and cannot be changed or reversed. Similarly, once the votes cast have been recorded and signed, they are final, verifiable (you can go and count the contents of the ballot box), and cannot be modified.

The difference between the two is that senior IEBC officials can change voter registration details and transfer voters. There is no single admin in Bitcoin who can move Bitcoin around or modify transactions.

Additionally, polling place biometric devices have the full register but can only authorize registered voters for that specific location. In Bitcoin, a transaction can be signed by any node on the network. This is probably an IEBC feature designed to make sure you don’t vote somewhere you don’t live.

Voting records are not kept in the voter registration register. The KIEMS device stores the voter register and scans the signed ballots while the votes remain in their respective boxes. The Bitcoin ledger, on the other hand, stores both addresses and Bitcoins.

Although it is debatable whether the designer of the system was directly inspired by the Bitcoin network, the similar characteristics are convincing to conclude that they were inspired by the Bitcoin blockchain. If you wanted a foolproof system with no single point of failure, where else would you look?

Disclosure: I own bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies.

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The Gear You Need to Ride the Bike Path – Chicago Tribune https://aspect-sdm.org/the-gear-you-need-to-ride-the-bike-path-chicago-tribune/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/the-gear-you-need-to-ride-the-bike-path-chicago-tribune/

Nothing beats the joy and freedom of riding a bike on long, languid summer days. Packing for a successful bike trip, however, requires advance planning. All two-wheeled adventures require safety essentials like hydration, a tool kit, goggles, gloves, and a helmet, as well as comfortable cycling clothes and other items that may be hard to find to your destination.

If you’re thinking of renting a bike, book one in advance – ongoing COVID-era supply chain issues have made it increasingly impossible for manufacturers to keep up with demand. For a comfortable fit and safe ride, contact the store about the type of riding you plan to do and your skill level. Most reputable companies will ask you to send in body measurements: height, weight, inseam, arm span, and something called the “monkey index”, a comparison of your arm span with your height, which helps calculate how stretched you will feel. on a rental bike.

The better you plan and prepare for your trip, the more you can relax and enjoy the ride. Here is a list to help you plan each specific adventure with suggestions on suitable equipment manufacturers.

Cycling shell: Day rides almost always involve changing weather conditions. Bring a lightweight windproof and waterproof jacket. 7Mesh’s co-pilot is tough to beat.

Packs: Whether you prefer to store snacks and essentials on the handlebars, behind the saddle, or stowed on the top tube in front of the stem, Cedaro has a pack ready to go to fit your size and style bike.

Lighting: Bontrager’s Ion Pro RT rechargeable front bike light has five modes for added safety day or night.

Helmet: Almost all helmets sold today offer MIPS (Multi-Directional Impact Protection System) or similar technology that helps reduce the rotational movement of the head during a crash, which helps protect the brain . Lazer helmets offer MIPS protection and have a five-star rating from Virginia Tech Helmet Ratings.

Padded Bib Shorts: Spandex is hard to beat when you’re spending long days in the saddle because it’s streamlined, compressive and comfortable. Bibs are even better because they fit perfectly over a jersey and relieve pressure from the waist. Many women’s bibs now feature drop-down backs so riders can easily relieve themselves mid-ride. Most important: the thickness and shape of the chamois. Pearl Izumi has several options.

Cycling jersey: With a full-zip front and two or three generous back pockets large enough to store cell phones, bananas, energy bars or extra layers, a good cycling jersey helps regulate body temperature and keep important objects nearby. Rapha make silky long and short sleeve versions in high moisture wicking fabrics.

Panniers: Many multi-day bike trips have a sag rack, i.e. a van that follows you with your luggage. But if you’re traveling independently, you’ll need those packs that attach to racks on the rear, front, or both wheels. German company Ortlieb makes a variety of styles of waterproof panniers depending on the length of the trip and the type of bike you ride.

Anti-chafing cream: Long days in the saddle can cause sores. The go-to skin lubricant to help prevent chafing is Chamois Butt’r; 91% allergen-free product washes body and shorts with soap and water.

Tool Kit: Prepared ride with multi-tool, spare inner tube, tire levers, extra chain lube and master link. Build your own toolkit at REI.

Sunglasses: Sun and wind combined with the speed of an e-bike make sunglasses more essential than ever. Roka offers lightweight styles ranging from wraparounds to wayfarers that have non-slip nose pads, offer high-quality optics with SPF protection, and are sweat, chemical, and fingerprint resistant.

Panniers: Store your beach gear in Specialized’s Tailwind pannier. The 17L waterproof pack, compatible with standard racks, is so streamlined that it claims to reduce battery consumption by 6%.

Footwear: Flip flops aren’t the best choice when pedaling in a motorized vehicle. Many companies like Shimano make e-bike-approved shoes that have a stiffer midsole that acts as leverage while pedaling, among other features to make a long day on an e-bike safer and more relaxing.

Mirror: If your e-bike adventure involves a road with cars, invest in a clip-on mirror like this one from Rad Power Bikes that fits any handlebar with an outside diameter between 21mm and 26mm.

GPS Bike Computer: Download local Trailforks maps, upload your ride to Strava, monitor your heart rate, and let loved ones track your ride with the smart, small, and intuitive Wahoo Elemnt Bolt.

Hydration: It’s almost impossible to drink too much water on a long, hot summer day in the saddle. Osprey makes fanny packs and backpacks designed to maximize the ease and effectiveness of on-the-fly hydration.

Gloves: It is essential to keep your hands free from sweat, bar friction and dirt, sticks and rocks in the event of a fall. Giro offers a full range of MTB protective gloves for men and women.

Helmet: Whether used to block glare from the sun, protect the face from incoming detritus, or just because it looks cool, most mountain bike-specific helmets have “visors” or adjustable visors . The Kortal Race MIPS helmet from Swedish brand POC has been tested at higher impact velocities than standard bicycle use.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

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OnePlus 10 Pro: long-term review https://aspect-sdm.org/oneplus-10-pro-long-term-review/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 16:03:02 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/oneplus-10-pro-long-term-review/

Over the years, OnePlus has managed to transform itself from an emerging player into a well-established premium brand. Some are not happy with the transformation of the company, especially for the introduction of too many phones in the market and have lost track of the timely delivery of software updates. An example of this is the OnePlus 9RT, which only received Android 12 (launched August 2021) last week.

However, OnePlus has lived up to the hype is that the company has steadily improved the build quality and remains above the two big rival brands Samsung and Apple in terms of offering a charging experience of faster battery.

OnePlus also tried to improve the photography experience on its phones by collaborating with Hasselblad in the OnePlus 9 (2021) series. It didn’t start well, but with follow-up software updates, the company managed to keep its reputation intact.

The company’s first premium phone of 2022 – OnePlus 10 Pro comes with a good upgrade over the predecessor. It has a better camera (with Hasselblad system), faster loading speed and a fast and powerful Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 processor.

It comes in two options – 8GB RAM + 128GB storage and 12GB RAM + 256GB storage – for Rs 66,999 and Rs 71,999, respectively.

I’ve been using the OnePlus 10 Pro for almost two months and here are my thoughts on the premium Android phone.

Design, build quality and display
OnePlus 10 Pro has a new design compared to the predecessor and also, and the large triple camera module along with the Hasselband branding make the phone really stand out among rival brands.

The camera module, which includes 3D ceramic based on nano-microcrystalline, blends beautifully with the shell. It’s not only visually good, but it helps the phone slide in and out of the phone smoothly. Also, the frosted matte finish of the phone (Volcanic Black model) has its advantages. It resists fingerprints perfectly and stays smudge-free all day.

OnePlus 10 Pro. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

You’ll find the brand alert slider at the top right of the edge, and below that, the power button. And on the opposite side there is a volume rocker. At the top there’s a solitary mic and at the bottom there’s a powerful single grille speaker with a Type-C port and mic.

The company offers a silicone case with the retail box, while its two competitors don’t even offer charger adapters with their phones. This initiative ensures that the OnePlus 10 Pro lasts longer with the owner and somehow helps to reduce the negative impact on the environment.

On the front, OnePlus 10 Pro sports a gorgeous 6.7-inch (3216 x 1440 pixels) quad HD+ 3D (LTPO 2.0) curved flexible AMOLED display panel. It supports a maximum brightness of 1300 nits and an adaptive refresh rate of 1Hz to 120Hz.

I had an enjoyable time watching YouTube movies and vlogs on the OnePlus 10 Pro. The screen manages to reproduce nearly accurate colors and also darker shades of black and gray that stand out naturally. Additionally, 120Hz refresh rates improve browsing and gaming on the phone.


OnePlus 10 Pro. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

In addition, eye comfort guarantees a reduction in the emission of blue light on the screen and does not tire the eyes at night.

The display also comes with an in-display fingerprint sensor. It is ergonomically placed above the base, so that the thumb or even the fingers can easily reach and unlock the screen. Compared to others in this segment, the false rejection rate is low on the OnePlus 10 Pro.

Photography
OnePlus 10 Pro houses a triple camera module powered by a second-generation Hasselblad photography system – 48MP main (Sony IMX789 1/1.43-inch sensor, f/1.8, OIS: optical image stabilization) + 50MP ultra- 150-degree wide (1/2.76-inch Samsung JN1 sensor) + 8MP telephoto sensor (f/2.4 aperture, OIS 3.3x optical zoom) with LED flash.


Example of OnePlus 10 Pro camera. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

It takes brilliant photos in natural sunlight. The subjects especially the flowers, the colors are vibrant and detailed in the photos. The dynamic range in the sample images is correct.

Ultra wide-angle mode accommodates more area in the frame. The camera does not over-process bending structures to squeeze more area into the photo.


Example of OnePlus 10 Pro camera with ultra wide-angle mode. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

The sample shot of the Nandi Hills was taken in the late afternoon with the sun in the background. The colors of the hill range remain neutral, close to what we perceive through the eyes.

Even the optical zoom manages to get quality images without any drastic loss in quality. The digital zoom samples start accumulating noise once we get past 10X zoom. But, even with a 30X zoom (maximum), we can identify some structures at the top of the hill.


Example of OnePlus 10 Pro camera. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

Portrait mode does a decent job not only with the human face, but also with flowers. Edge detection is excellent and the camera is able to bring a natural bokeh effect in the background.


Example of OnePlus 10 Pro camera. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

In Night Sight mode, the images are good. As you can see from the sample images, the streetlights are captured well and they also don’t turn off like I’ve seen on other phones. The brightness is controlled, and the colors of the sodium vapor lamps in the background and the LED street lamp have a noticeable distinction and a natural look.


Example of OnePlus 10 Pro camera with Night Sight mode enabled. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

The 4K video quality is also quite good and in terms of stability it’s on par with most rival brands, but not the Apple iPhone 13 series.

At the front, it houses a 32MP snapper (Sony IMX615 sensor, f/2.4) for selfies. Image quality is decent and users can play around with photo enhancement tools and filters. Yes, like its Chinese counterparts, OnePlus also offers superficial tools to adjust skin texture, cheeks, eye size, nose, chin and head size and even performs touch-ups to improve skin color. the skin. They did a decent job removing the acne scars on my face.


Example of OnePlus 10 Pro camera. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

It should be noted that OnePlus has released several updates with camera improvements and they have really improved the photography experience, which is appreciated.

Performance
Under the hood, it houses a 4nm-class Snapdragon 8 Gen 1, 8GB/12GB LPDDR5 RAM, 128/256GB storage (UFS 3.1) and Android 12-based OxygeOS 12, and a 5,000mAh battery. with 80W fast charging.


OnePlus 10 Pro performance score on the Geekbench 5.0 app. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

OnePlus 10 Pro is a smooth performer. He showed no signs of lag during the entire examination period. Whether recording in 4K or playing power-hungry high-end games such as Asphalt 9: Legends, the phone was able to run smoothly and, although it did get a bit warm, it didn’t. never exceeded my comfort level.

Additionally, the OxygenOS 12 is clean and there are no duplicate utility apps such as third-party browsers, photo-editing apps, and other storage-consuming junk, ensuring owners more space to install more apps they like and also be create more memories of loved ones with photos and videos.


OnePlus 10 Pro. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

OnePlus 10 Pro houses a 5,000mAh battery and consistently lasts more than a day under normal usage. I’m not an extreme user in terms of gaming and binge-watching, but for the sake of testing I go overboard on weekends. I explored farm fields at my in-laws house to take photos, test video stability, 4K recording and also watch media content on OTT apps for at least two hours and one hour of gaming. The phone has could easily last a full day with a battery level of around 25%. On weekdays, I usually watch food vlogs for two and a half years of my commute (home to office and vice versa) and the rest of the day, browsing social media platforms, keeping up to date with the latest trends on the web and responding to emails. In this scenario, the phone typically lasted a day and a half.

And with an 80W charger, it takes just over 45 minutes to fully charge from zero to 100%. And within 25 minutes of charging, it can very quickly recharge to 60% capacity.

Final Thoughts
Having used the OnePlus 10 Pro as a secondary device for over two months, it lives up to the true “tag” of the premium flagship phone. It checks out all the basic features – the display, build quality, excellent battery life and SuperVooC fast charging are such a value edit.

And Hasselblad’s collaboration with the camera system definitely made the new OnePlus 10 Pro better than its predecessor. Plus, photo quality is on par with any high-end phone in most aspects, including low-light conditions.


OnePlus 10 Pro. Credit: DH Photo/KVN Rohit

There is one major reason you should consider buying the OnePlus 10 Pro is that it might be the last premium OnePlus to feature the alert slider as the company has decided to remove the feature brand in the upcoming OnePlus 10T.

OnePlus says it wants to bring new features to the 10T and also keep the structural profile slim.

Although the alert slider is considered a minor feature for some, it is a very useful button and also a unique attribute that sets the OnePlus brand apart from Android phones. Users can change the ringtone to vibrate or silent mode with a simple swipe gesture and many love this attribute of OnePlus phones.

Overall, the OnePlus 10 Pro is a reliable premium phone and also a good collector’s phone, as it’s the latest of the company’s phones to feature a signature alert slider. Unless OnePlus brings it back in the future with a special edition phone, like Apple is doing with the iPhone SE series with TouchID sensor.

Advantages
Superior build quality
good performer
worthy camera hardware
Excellent battery and remarkable fast charging capability
The inconvenients
No IP rating for water and dust resistance

Get the latest news on new launches, gadget reviews, apps, cybersecurity and more on personal tech only on DH Tech.

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Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises https://aspect-sdm.org/realme-pad-x-review-a-good-budget-tablet-with-some-compromises/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 01:30:00 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/realme-pad-x-review-a-good-budget-tablet-with-some-compromises/
  • The Realme Pad X is the latest tablet from the company.
  • The tablet comes with decent specs and is aimed at entry-level users.
  • Here is my Realme Pad X review which will help you decide if you should buy the device or not.

Tablets have become a big commodity for smartphone makers, with companies like Xiaomi, Oppo and Realme releasing their own tablets. Realme has now launched the Pad X, the company’s latest Android tablet in India, along with other devices like a smartwatch, TWS headphones, monitor and more.

The Realme Pad X is an entry-level device aimed at new tablet users. The main highlights of the device include its large screen, long battery life and loud sound.

The Realme Pad X competes with the likes of the Xiaomi Pad 5 and Oppo Pad Air.

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I’ve been using the Realme Pad X for a few days now and here is my review of the company’s latest tablet that will help you decide whether you should buy it or not.

Realme Pad X price and availability

The Realme Pad X is priced at ₹19,999 for the 4GB Wi-Fi variant, ₹25,999 for the 4GB LTE variant, and ₹27,999 for the 6GB LTE variant.

Realme Pad X Specifications


Details Features
Display 10.9-inch 2K LCD display
Refresh rate 60Hz
Pencil case Yes, sold separately
Processor Snapdragon 695
Variants 4GB+64GB and 6GB+128GB
Rear camera 13MP
Camera for selfies 8MP
Battery 8340mAh
Quick charge 33W
Fingerprint sensor Nope
lester Wi-Fi – 499 grams | LTE – 506 grams

Advantages and disadvantages of the Realme Pad X

Advantages

  • Big battery
  • 2K display
  • 5G support

The inconvenients

  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • No fingerprint sensor
  • No 3.5mm audio jack

Realme Pad X design

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Realme Pad X designSurabh Jain

The Realme Pad X features a minimalist design and comes with a matte-finish plastic back, giving it a premium look. The matte back ensures that you won’t leave fingerprints behind, so you don’t have to worry about them when using the tablet.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
The Realme Pad X weighs around 500 grams.Surabh Jain


The Wi-Fi version weighs 499 grams and the LTE version weighs 506 grams. You may find it a little heavy if you hold it in one hand for long periods of time. However, you won’t have any problems with normal use.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Realme Pad X back designSurabh Jain

On the back, you’ll all find a camera module in the top left corner and Realme branding in the bottom right corner.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Realme Pad X front designSurabh Jain

On the front, the tablet features a large 10.9-inch display and decent bezels on all sides. The selfie camera has been placed on the right side, making it easier for you to video call in landscape mode.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Realme Pad X volume rockersSurabh Jain

The tablet comes with volume rockers and a microphone on the right side.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Realme Pad X SIM and microSD card slot.Surabh Jain

On the left you have the SIM and microSD card slot.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Power button and Realme Pad X speaker grilles.Surabh Jain

You get the power button, a microphone, and two speaker grilles at the top.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Loudspeaker grilles and USB Type-C port at the bottom.Surabh Jain

At the bottom you get two speaker grilles and the USB Type-C port. Realme did not offer a 3.5mm audio jack with the device. So, if you often use headphones while charging the device, you will have to opt for Bluetooth headphones.

Realme Pad X screen

The Realme Pad X has a large 10.9-inch 2K TFT display with 450 nits brightness and 60Hz refresh rate. While it’s good to have a 2K resolution panel, the low rate refresh rate is disappointing, especially when rivals such as the Xiaomi Pad 5 offer a 120Hz display at a similar price.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Realme Pad X screenSurabh Jain

The screen is bright and offers dynamic visuals. It works well indoors and outdoors, so you won’t have to worry about using it in the sun.

It’s ideal for students taking classes or people looking for a good tablet to catch up on their favorite movies and shows.

RealmePad X software

If you’ve used a Realme phone or tablet before, you’ll be familiar with the company’s Realme user interface. The Pad X runs on Android 11 with Realme UI on top. In terms of bloatware, you only get the Facebook app and the Amazon Prime video app with the tablet; even these can be easily uninstalled.

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Realme Pad X AppsSurabh Jain

The tablet comes with the Kids Space app, which has preloaded content for kids and lets you use parental controls to set daily limits, bedtimes, and more. I did not notice any issues or glitches with the software during my use. Apps opened quickly and switching between apps was smooth.

The large screen, combined with the tablet’s split-screen feature, lets you multitask without any hassle.

Realme Pad X performance and battery life

The Realme Pad X is equipped with the Snapdragon 690 chipset, a mid-range processor launched over two years ago. Although it’s a slightly older chipset, you won’t experience any issues in terms of day-to-day use.

The tablet comes with up to 6GB of RAM and 128GB of internal storage. While the storage is on the bottom side, you get a microSD card slot which lets you expand the internal storage up to 512GB.

The LTE variant lets you make and receive calls and use mobile data. The tablet comes with powerful speakers and decent microphones. I found the call quality to be decent and had no problems making or receiving calls.

If you plan to play games, you will be able to play most games with good quality graphics. However, you might notice a slight stutter if you’re playing fast-paced games like Call of Duty: Mobile or Apex Legends.

When it comes to battery life, the tablet packs a large 8340mAh battery with 33W fast charging support. It offers excellent battery life so you won’t have to worry about running out of battery quickly. Note that it takes nearly 3 hours to fully charge; however, this is expected given the huge battery.

Realme Pad X Camera

Realme Pad X review – a good budget tablet with some compromises
Realme Pad X camera moduleSurabh Jain

The Realme Pad X has a 13 MP main camera and an 8 MP selfie camera. The cameras are average and you shouldn’t expect anything amazing from them.

Images captured even in abundant light are grainy and images captured in low light conditions have a lot of noise.

The selfie camera is decent and comes with the limelight feature, which is useful in video calls and tracks your movements, keeping you in the middle of the frame. It works with Google Meet and Zoom, making it a great feature for users who often use their tablets for video calls.

Wrap

The Realme Pad X is a mixed bag with its fair share of pros and cons. This can be considered if you’re looking for an affordable tablet and are willing to compromise on things like a high refresh rate and a fingerprint sensor. I think the LTE variants are slightly overpriced and the company could have set them a bit lower. It’s good to have 5G support on the tablet, as the commercial rollout of 5G is expected soon.

Overall, the Realme Pad X is a decent tablet, and if you’re looking for a device that offers decent performance and good battery life, you might want to consider the Realme Pad X.
SEE ALSO:

Realme Pad Mini review – a good option for beginner users

Amazfit T-Rex 2 review – a rugged, feature-rich smartwatch

Redmi K50i review: A solid performer but lacks the charm of its predecessor

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2023 Hyundai Tucson Review, Ratings, Specs, Price and Photos https://aspect-sdm.org/2023-hyundai-tucson-review-ratings-specs-price-and-photos/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 17:37:35 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/2023-hyundai-tucson-review-ratings-specs-price-and-photos/

What type of vehicle is the 2023 Hyundai Tucson? What does it compare to?

The Tucson five-seat crossover SUV goes up against other compact bestsellers, including the Toyota RAV4, Honda CR-V, Nissan Rogue and Ford Escape.

Is the 2023 Hyundai Tucson a good vehicle?

The review continues below

The latest Tucson gets a TCC rating of 6.7 out of 10, due to strong tech offerings, a comfortable and spacious interior, and plenty of safety features. Holding the Tucson back is an average fuel economy score, based on the gas-powered version, and an overall four-star crash rating from NHTSA. (Learn more about how we rate cars.)

What’s new for the 2023 Hyundai Tucson?

The Tucson SEL no longer offers the Premium Package. Synthetic leather upholstery now covers the seats of the SEL (and SEL Hybrid) with the Convenience Package as well as the XRT. Finally, the 10.3-inch touchscreen is now standard on XRT, N Line and Limited models, as well as SEL Convenience, Limited Hybrids and Plug-In Hybrids.

The latest Tucson ditched the nameless shape it had worn for generations. Now it’s just kinks and creases, a radical piece of origami in a niche that veers into SUV cliches when it veers at all. The striking grille carries a puffy jacket texture and hides the LED lighting which only emerges when it shines. With sharp, chamfered sides, he crafted an 8-bit CrossFit body, with a metal flute that runs across the roofline like Oakleys worn upside down. It has our full attention on the outside, but on the inside it’s a more discreet job. A large touchscreen dominates a flat, monolithic center console covered in a glossy trim that lures fingerprints out of hiding. The cockpit’s point is its digital displays, mostly for the better – their interfaces are clean and easy to grasp.

The Tucson offers the full range of powertrains from a 2.5-liter inline-4 with 187 horsepower and an 8-speed automatic – front or all-wheel drive – to a 1. 6 liter mated to a 6-speed automatic transmission. which develops 226 hp. Either way, the Tucson’s capable suspension dampens its body movements well, and its steering has quick responses, if not plenty of feel until it’s engaged in Sport mode. The best Tucson is the most expensive: the Plug-In Hybrid can go 32 miles on battery power alone from an upgraded 13.8 kWh pack, and its net 261 hp is strong and safe.

With plenty of room for four adults and around 40 cubic feet of cargo, the Tucson became a front-end rival for vehicles like the CR-V. It needs a finer quality of interior trim for a knockout: the interior’s digital displays cast a shadow over the plain plastic qualities it wears from the door caps down.

The Tucson has standard automatic emergency braking and automatic high beams; The SELs benefit from active lane control and blind spot monitors. Adaptive cruise control, blind-spot steering support and a surround-view camera system are available on higher-end models. Base Tucsons have an 8.0-inch touchscreen with wireless Apple CarPlay and wired Android Auto. Premium Bose audio and automatic climate control are available, as is a 10.3-inch touchscreen with support for wired-only smartphones.

How much does the 2023 Hyundai Tucson cost?

The Tucson is offered in four trim levels for gasoline models (SE, SEL, N-Line and Limited) and three for the Tucson Hybrid (Blue, SEL Convenience and Limited). Pricing for 2023 has not been confirmed, but will likely increase from last year’s base price of $26,135. The Tucson SEL is the best value at $27,685 in 2022 dollars, a few thousand more in hybrid spec. It is possible to spend upwards of $45,000 for a Tucson Plug-In Hybrid.

Where is the 2023 Hyundai Tucson made?

Hyundai builds gas-powered Tucsons in Montgomery, Alabama, and other versions in Ulsan, South Korea.

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6 FinTech trends that will dominate the industry in 2022 https://aspect-sdm.org/6-fintech-trends-that-will-dominate-the-industry-in-2022/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 16:09:55 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/6-fintech-trends-that-will-dominate-the-industry-in-2022/

2022 may have started out as the year of blockchain technologies and NFTs, but since March the crypto market has seen a significant decline.

However, despite the cooling of the crypto, some trends continued to thrive throughout the mid-year. This article will discuss six FinTech trends that we believe will boom in 2022.

SEE ALSO: Security Alert: Fake Windows exploits the InfoSec community with a Cobalt Strike

Web3

In the beginning, there was Web 1.0. It was a time, starting in 1994, when content on the Internet was non-interactive and read-only. Starting in 2004, Web 2.0 introduced interactivity to websites and the Internet. Today, 18 years later, Web 3.0 has begun its introduction.

Web3 combines four technologies to make it its thing:

  • Decentralization via blockchain
  • Peer-to-peer exchange (reduction of third parties)
  • Artificial intelligence
  • machine learning

Wolfram Alpha is a sample Web 3.0 application. Wolfram is a computer intelligence calculator that can solve extremely difficult problems ranging from elementary math problems to personal health. There are hundreds of calculations this software can do, and it can give you all kinds of interesting data.

Typing “Facebook” in the stock data section will provide you with all the information that would interest you as a mid-level trader. In the finance section alone, more than 36 calculations can be performed and discovered. Apps like this keep popping up all over the internet, so keep your eyes peeled.

Cross-border e-commerce

Cross-border e-commerce has grown significantly over the past 2 years due to COVID-19, but it has exploded into another period of growth with the introduction of Web 3.0.

The integration of decentralized peer-to-peer crypto exchanges has allowed people around the world to buy and sell even more products. Avoiding tariffs and fees from governments or third-party companies has increased profits for every seller, driving growth.

In 2022, cross-border e-commerce reached 22% of the entire e-commerce sector. This number is expected to rise to 38% by 2023, or about $2.1 trillion. Even with the growth of peer-to-peer exchanges, the current continuous computable growth is due to the reselling of Amazon, Wish.com and Alibaba.

Open banking APIs

The best way to explode an industry is to make technology accessible to everyone. Banks are now starting to open their software to developers to create their products.

APIs or Application Programming Interfaces refer to two different codes that interact and share data with each other. You can think of them as a digital transfer between friends. These APIs have opened up opportunities for developers to access payment networks and integrate banks into platforms.

Stripe is a good example of access to the payment network allowing developers to integrate subscriptions, payments and other purchases directly into their programs. Banking integrations have taken the form of direct transactions like those found in PayPal or Robinhood. Barclay’s is one of the first banks to integrate other banking information into a single app and offer users a one-stop shop for all their banking needs, including paying their insurance bills on time.

Voice biometrics

Fingerprint scanners have been around for decades, protecting our personal information. One technology that has gained momentum in recent months is voice biometrics. Like this scene in the movie Unbelievable, When a chic superhero outfit designer says “Edna Mode” and opens a door, this technology will figuratively open many to come.

Uses of this biometric identification are being tested in customer service calls by banks to speed up the flow of information. You will no longer have to give very sensitive personal information over the phone and risk someone overhearing it. Using the phonetic and morphological characteristics of each person’s voice apparatus creates unique identifiers that enable secure authentication with just the sound of your voice.

Like other means of verifying your identity, voice biometrics offer a much higher level of security than traditional knowledge-based authentication (passwords).

Digital banks only

Similar to ghost restaurants, digital-only banks have no physical location, and banks get many financial benefits from going completely virtual. Companies like SoFi, Ally, and Synchrony Financial have taken the banking world by storm, becoming one of the most valuable financial institutions in the NYSC.

The advantages of virtual-only banks are not limited to the possibility of accessing your institute anywhere. Benefits also manifest themselves in increased savings rates, low monthly fees, higher CD rates, and business banking benefits. By not having to pay as many expenses, the company can offer you better deals and offer much more rewards than traditional banks.

For this reason, many traditionally physically located financial institutions are shifting to more online banking. According to the Federal Reserve, in 2020 the United States saw 3,700 sites permanently close, a 23% increase from the average of 3,000 annual closures between 2008 and 2017.

Automation of robotic processes

Robotic process automation (RBA) is every bit as futuristic as it sounds. It may not involve physical robots, but the tasks it can perform are still the same. It’s a classic case where replacing humans with software has become much more cost-effective and beneficial for the banks that implement it.

Instead of having a human manually process a decision and then send it back for approval, these tasks can be completed entirely by the work of a computer. The reduction in costs by robotic replacement can vary between 30% and 70% and reduce processing times by 60%. RPAs are used for various tasks such as accounts payable, mortgage processing, fraud detection, etc.

And after?

With the world in uninterrupted crisis mode for 2.5 years, it looks like innovation will continue to thrive. Problems are the mother of innovation, and as long as turmoil continues in our world, massive changes will be seen across all industries. With a recession on the horizon, who knows what financial products are yet to come.

Photo credit: Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock

Lee Li is a project manager and B2B copywriter with a decade of experience in the Chinese fintech startup space as PM for TaoBao, MeitTuan, and DouYin (now TikTok).

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Discrimination of Curculigo orchioides Rhizoma and Curculigo glabrescens Rhizoma using stable isotope and mineral element analyzes coupled with chemometrics https://aspect-sdm.org/discrimination-of-curculigo-orchioides-rhizoma-and-curculigo-glabrescens-rhizoma-using-stable-isotope-and-mineral-element-analyzes-coupled-with-chemometrics/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 16:30:31 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/discrimination-of-curculigo-orchioides-rhizoma-and-curculigo-glabrescens-rhizoma-using-stable-isotope-and-mineral-element-analyzes-coupled-with-chemometrics/

HPLC Feature Generator

Chemical characteristics can be used to describe and evaluate medicinal substances as a whole. The HPLC method has good accuracy, sensitivity and reproducibility, and can be used to quickly and specifically identify different herbs based on overall chemical composition. The HPLC chromatograms of COR and CGR are shown in Fig. 2. Component identities were confirmed based on retention time and UV spectra (285 nm) of chemical markers. The main chemical components of COR and CGR were similar. As expected, the content of curculigoside (peak 1), the indicator component of COR, was not significantly different from that of CGR. Interestingly, CGR contains a unique compound that was detected in HPLC chromatograms, but was not found in the COR profile. Therefore, this unique compound was specifically separated and purified, and the structure was identified by modern spectroscopic techniques. This was a new compound determined to be 5-(3′,4′-dihydroxyphenyl)-1-(4″-hydroxyphenyl)pentane-1,4-dione, 1D and 2D NMR spectra were available at Figs. S1 – S5. However, the low content of this compound was not sufficient to accurately distinguish between two plant sources.

Figure 2

High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) chromatogram of curculigoside, COR and CGR samples. Peak 1: curculigoside.

Variations in the stable isotope ratios of COR and CGR

The variations of the stable isotopic compositions between COR and CGR have been presented in Fig. 3. Mean N% values ​​in COR and CGR samples were 1.898% and 0.720%, N% values ​​in COR were significantly higher (Fig. 3a). The mean C% values ​​of the COR and CGR samples were 40.052% and 39.998%, respectively (Fig. 3b). The average δ15The COR N value was -3.157‰, which was significantly lower than the CGR value, with a mean value of -0.173‰ (Fig. 3c). The average δ13The COR C value was -28.678‰, which was significantly higher than the CGR value, with a mean value of -31.487‰ (Fig. 3d). There were significant differences in the mean value of N%, δ15N and δ13C according to botanical origins (all P< 0.01 of J -test).

picture 3
picture 3

The relative content of element N (N%, a), element C (C%, b) and the nitrogen isotope ratio (δ15NOT, vs) and the carbon isotope ratio (δ13VS, D). Data were expressed as mean ± SD. (**P < 0.01).

The 3D point cloud of N%, δ15N and δ13The C values ​​have been presented in Fig. 4, and they showed excellent ability to predict COR and CGR. Overall, the COR had a high N% and δ13C, and a low δ15N value, so they gathered in the upper section of the 3D chart. However, the CGR, on the other hand, mainly appeared at the bottom. The stable isotope ratio shows a good effect to distinguish different sources of Curculigo Rhizome.

Figure 4
number 4

3D point cloud of N%, δ15N and δ13C values ​​in COR and CGR.

Analysis of mineral elements

The mineral element contents in the COR and CGR samples are shown in Table 1. The results appeared to be significantly different between the two source species except for B, Mg, K, Ca, Cu, Se, Ba. K and Ca were the most abundant inorganic elements in COR and CGR. The contents of Li, Al, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn and Cd were higher in the COR than in the CGR, while the concentrations of the elements Na, Ti, Fe, Sr and Mo were present at a lower level in the COR samples.

Table 1 Average mineral element concentrations (μg/g) of 10 COR samples and 9 CGR samples.

Principal component analysis of COR and CGR

Multivariate assessment is needed to improve the overall accuracy of COR and CGR. Based on the chemical analysis of the stable isotope ratios combined with the concentrations of 19 mineral elements, the result of the PCA analysis has been presented in Fig. 5a. The vectors and the cumulative contribution of the variance of the first three PCs (PC1-3) have been presented in Table S3. A three-factor model (the top three PCs with eigenvalues ​​>1) can explain 88.0% of the total variability in the original data, which showed that the top three PCs can reflect most of the information in the samples. PC1, PC2 and PC3 contributed 61.0%, 19.8% and 7.2% of the total variance respectively. The result showed that 10 COR samples grouped together and 9 CGR samples grouped into another category. It was presented that COR and CGR samples can be well distinguished by PCA. Notably, three batches of COR from Yunnan tend to be distinguished from Sichuan.

Figure 5
number 5

PCA ranking result. Scatter plots of the COR and CGR samples (a), PCA biplot for components PC1 and PC2 (b).

The PCA biplot of PC1 and PC2 has been shown in Fig. 5b. PC1 was mainly correlated with N% intensity, δ13C, Li, K, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and negatively correlated with δ15Signal N, Sr, Mo35.36. The intensity of B, Al, Fe, Ni, Ba was significant in PC2. COR samples (1–7) from Sichuan were mainly affected by the content of N% and elements Li, K, Mn, Zn, Co, Cd, while COR samples from Yunnan (8–10) were isolated. PC1 had a better ability to discriminate COR samples. However, CGR samples (11–19) were clustered with δ15N, Ti, Sr, Mo. The classification of RGCs was related to the content of these elements and can be distinguished by them. Plant metabolic activities were found to have a greater impact on the δ content13C that environmental factors24.26. Therefore, the difference between COR and CGR samples may be due to the different elements accumulated in plant metabolism.

Identification of COR and CGR by OPLS-DA

To further utilize the potential discrimination capability of stable isotope and phased array analysis, OPLS-DA was used to process the data of COR samples and counterfeit CGR samples, and the result was shown in Fig. 6. Genuine COR samples and counterfeit CGR samples were significantly differentiated, indicating that stable isotope ratios and element contents combined with OPLS-DA analysis was an effective method to separate COR and CGR samples . The number of important components is determined by calculating the explained variance X (R2X), deviation Y (R2Y), and the predictive ability of cross-validation (Q2) 37. The evaluation parameters of the OPLS-DA prediction models were: R2X = 0.800, R2Y = 0.993, Q2 = 0.991. Generally, the model has good fit when these values ​​are close to 1.0, the point of intersection of R2 and Q2 with the Y axis must be less than 0.3 and 0.05 respectively, and the difference between R2 and Q2is less than 0.338.39. Therefore, the results showed that this OPLS-DA model was reliable. In addition, VIP > 1 was considered a good identification marker27,34,40and OPLS-DA provided 13 effective potential markers (δ15N, Cd, Sr, δ13C, N%, Co, Se, Ti, Zn, Li, Cu, Mn, K) to determine the authenticity of COR samples and counterfeit CGR samples (Fig. S7). Notably, the three CORs from Yunnan were also separated from the COR samples from Sichuan based on their stable isotope ratios and element contents by the OPLS-DA model. The results indicated that stable isotope ratios combined with element content may have the potential ability to predict the geographic origin of CurculigoRhizome. Based on these advantages, stable isotope ratios and element contents combined with OPLS-DA analysis provide an excellent method for discriminating COR and CGR samples.

Figure 6
number 6

Result of the OPLS-DA classification. Score charts showing the classification of genuine COR and counterfeit CGR samples.

Classification of Curculigo Rhizoma using LDA

To verify the reliability of the classification model, LDA was performed using a cross-validation procedure to calculate the classification and probability of the COR and CGR samples.23.28. The cross-validation result was displayed in Table 2. The LDA model gave a good classification rate (100%) and the cross-validation rate (100%), COR and CGR were identified successfully. So the predictive model worked well, LDA analysis combined with stable isotopes and elements could be used to discriminate the two source species of CurculigoRhizome.

Table 2 Classification of COR and CGR samples based on discriminant analysis.
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NYU Langone plans to partner with Fermilab’s SQMS to advance MRI analysis https://aspect-sdm.org/nyu-langone-plans-to-partner-with-fermilabs-sqms-to-advance-mri-analysis/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 16:12:18 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/nyu-langone-plans-to-partner-with-fermilabs-sqms-to-advance-mri-analysis/

From magnetic resonance imaging machines to an advanced quantum computer in development, researchers are exploring the potential applications of two superconducting technologies to revolutionize medical imaging. Researchers plan to explore a new method for analyzing MRIs through a new partnership between the Superconducting Quantum Materials and Systems Center, housed at the US Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and New York University Langone Health. It marks the first SQMS Center partnership that would directly advance healthcare.

When doctors analyze MRI images, one of the most common medical imaging techniques used to create an image of a patient’s body organs and tissues, they use their knowledge of the human body and their experience in interpretation of MRI images to diagnose disease or prescribe treatment to patients.

MRI technicians performing an MRI on a patient. Photo: New York University Langone

Medical imaging scientists are now on the hunt for quantitative MRI, or qMRI. This innovative process would involve computers working alongside doctors to help identify and characterize tissue to complement doctors’ interpretation of images.

Then add quantum computing to the equation.

When fully realized, quantum computers will offer a huge increase in computing power. The algorithms that these next-generation computers will use to perform calculations could significantly improve qMRI and facilitate its translation into clinical practice. If accomplished, qMRI would give doctors a powerful tool to treat patients. Doctors would then have the ability to compare MRIs quantitatively instead of just looking at MRI images. By relying on quantifiable parameters rather than inconsistencies in the contrast of MRI images, healthcare professionals and researchers could use statistics and perform machine learning on MRI scans.

How an MRI machine works

Imagine: It’s a sunny day on Lake Michigan, and many sailboats are sitting in the water, facing random directions. Suddenly, a strong gust of wind blows across the lake, tacking their sails and steering the boats in one direction. These boats are like protons, a particle present in the nucleus of atoms. Protons have a property called magnetic moment, which means they act like tiny magnetic rods with a magnetic field pointing in a certain direction.

Using a strong magnet, an MRI machine, like the strong gust of wind, aligns the magnetic moment of protons in a patient’s body in the same direction. MRI technicians push protons away from the magnetic field with radio frequency pulses. When the magnetic moments of the protons reorient themselves towards the MRI’s magnetic field, they release electromagnetic energy, which the machine detects and uses to create an image.

“We hope to demonstrate that quantum computing can lead to faster and more comprehensive approaches to extract relevant biophysical information from MRI to improve clinical diagnostics.”
– Riccardo Lattanzi, Associate Professor of Radiology, NYU Grossman School of Medicine

Up to 60% of the human body is made up of water, which is unevenly concentrated in body tissues, so MRI machines normally target hydrogen protons in water molecules to vary the brightness of different tissues relative to each other, resulting in a detailed black and white image of the inside of a patient’s body.

“A technique for identifying the biophysical properties of human tissue using MRI is known as magnetic resonance fingerprinting and is an active area of ​​research at NYU Langone,” said Riccardo Lattanzi, professor fellow in radiology at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and a senior researcher in this field. Partnership. “In this method, MRI data is used as a ‘fingerprint’ to zero in on the underlying tissue properties that are ‘culprit’ for the observed behavior of the MRI signal.” Besides water content, other properties help create the contrast between body tissues during an MRI.

Research in quantum computing for health

Using data from the MRI machine and the information contained in the voxels, or 3D pixels, of the MRI image, doctors will be able to measure these properties to assess and monitor a patient’s health across multiple scans. Quantum computing can accelerate these measurements and generate more accurate simulations of an MRI signal to uncover the underlying properties of MRI data fingerprints.

“Using standard methods to perform these simulations, scientists can only simulate simplified biophysical models, but quantum computing could enable calculations that take into account the chemical exchanges between many molecules. This opens the door to more assessment. specifies properties of the human body,” Lattanzi said.

The research collaboration between NYU Langone and SQMS is proposed as a pilot program, involving two young researchers from each institution. These researchers would then develop algorithms used by future SQMS quantum computers to make accurate and fast estimates of several tissue properties from MRI scans.

Teacher. Riccardo Lattanzi of NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Photo: New York University Langone

“In this pilot program, we want to explore the use of quantum algorithms to optimize quantitative MRI,” Lattanzi said. “We hope to demonstrate that quantum computing can lead to faster and more comprehensive approaches to extract relevant biophysical information from MRI to improve clinical diagnostics. Quantum computers are becoming a growing reality, and we want to be ready to exploit their full potential. »

The SQMS host institution, Fermilab, conducts cutting-edge research into superconductors, or materials that lose their electrical resistance when cooled sufficiently. This property makes them ideal for making superconducting radiofrequency cavities to accelerate particles in particle accelerators, and now, for making a quantum computer.

Fermilab was selected to host one of five DOE National Quantum Information Science Research Centers under the National Quantum Initiative Act to develop a quantum computer based on superconducting technology, due to its expertise in superconductors used for particle accelerators. NYU has received approval from the DOE Office of Science to become a member of the SQMS Center. The start of the collaboration is pending final approval of a formal agreement between NYU and Fermi Research Alliance, LLC.

“SQMS is making significant progress in superconducting quantum computing, including the development of a 3D quantum processor based on SRF cavities. Working with NYU Langone on the MRI application will have a great impact on medicine and society and will help our technology experts refine the architectural details of our 3D-based SRF computers,” said Anna Grassellino, Director of SQMS. “We are delighted to welcome NYU and Professor Lattanzi to SQMS. The knowledge Lattanzi brings to the collaboration is a powerful continuation of the use of superconducting technologies.

The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is supported by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The Office of Science is the largest supporter of basic physical science research in the United States and works to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

The Center for Quantum Superconducting Materials and Systems at Fermilab is supported by the DOE Office of Science.

The Center for Quantum Superconducting Materials and Systems is one of five national quantum information science research centers of the United States Department of Energy. Led by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, SQMS is a collaboration of 23 partner institutions – national laboratories, universities and industry – working together to bring transformational advances in the field of quantum information science. The center leverages Fermilab’s expertise in building complex particle accelerators to design multi-qubit quantum processor platforms based on state-of-the-art qubits and superconducting technologies. Working hand-in-hand with partners in the embedded industry, SQMS will build a quantum computer and new quantum sensors at Fermilab, opening up unprecedented computing possibilities. For more information, please visit sqms.fnal.gov.

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The fingerprints of climate change on ever hotter heat waves https://aspect-sdm.org/the-fingerprints-of-climate-change-on-ever-hotter-heat-waves/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 16:01:11 +0000 https://aspect-sdm.org/the-fingerprints-of-climate-change-on-ever-hotter-heat-waves/



World


The fingerprints of climate change on ever hotter heat waves





PARIS (AFP) – Warmer, longer, more frequent. Heat waves like the one currently ravaging much of Europe, or the record-breaking heat wave experienced by India and Pakistan in March, are an unmistakable sign of climate change, experts said on Monday.

– Humans to blame –

“Every heatwave we experience today has been made warmer and more frequent due to human-induced climate change,” said Friederike Otto, senior lecturer at Imperial College London’s Grantham Institute for Climate Change. .

“It’s pure physics, we know how greenhouse gas molecules behave, we know there are more of them in the atmosphere, the atmosphere is getting warmer and that means we expect see more frequent heat waves and hotter heat waves.”

In recent years, advances in the discipline known as attribution science have allowed climatologists to calculate how much global warming contributes to individual extreme weather events.

The Indo-Pakistani heat wave, for example, would have been 30 times more likely with the warming of more than 1.1 degrees Celsius that human activity has caused since the mid-19th century.

The record-breaking heat wave across North America in June 2021, killing hundreds as temperatures soared to 50°C in places, would have been virtually impossible without global warming.

And the last major European heat wave, in 2019, was made 3C warmer by climate change.

“The increase in frequency, duration and intensity of these events over the past decades is clearly linked to observed global warming and can be attributed to human activity,” the Organization said on Monday. world weather forecast in a press release.

– The worst to come –


Despite the unbearable temperatures this week, scientists are unanimous: the worst is yet to come.

At 1.5°C of warming – the most ambitious target of the Paris climate accord – UN climatologists calculate that heat waves will be more than four times more likely than the pre-industrial baseline.

At 2°C or warming, this figure is 5.6 times more likely, and at 4°C, heat waves will be almost 10 times more likely to occur.

Despite three decades of UN-led negotiations, countries’ climate plans currently put the Earth on track to warm to a “catastrophic” level of 2.7C, according to the UN.

Matthieu Sorel, climatologist at Météo-France, said climate change was already influencing the frequency and severity of heat waves.

“We are on the way to increasingly hotter summers, where 35C is becoming the norm and 40C will be hit regularly,” he said.

– Danger of death –

Future heat waves largely depend on how quickly the global economy can decarbonize.

The United Nations Climate Science Panel has calculated that 14% of humanity will be hit by dangerous heat every five years on average with a warming of 1.5°C, compared to 37% at 2°C.

“In every place in the world where we have data, there is an increased risk of mortality when we are exposed to high temperatures,” said Eunice Lo, climatologist at the Cabot Institute for the Environment of the United States. University of Bristol.

It’s not just the most vulnerable people who are at risk of health impacts, it’s even fit and healthy people who will be at risk.”

There is a real risk in the future of so-called “wet bulb” temperatures – where heat combines with humidity to create conditions where the human body cannot cool itself through sweat – reaching deadly levels in many many parts of the world.

In addition to the imminent threat to human health, heat waves are worsening drought and making larger areas vulnerable to wildfires, such as those currently raging in parts of France, Portugal, Spain , Greece and Morocco.

They also threaten the food supply.

India, the world’s second-largest wheat producer, opted to ban grain exports after a heatwave impacted harvests, worsening a shortage in some countries caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, a key exporter.

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